My Mom’s 2015 Oscar Picks

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My Mom takes her yearly Oscar picks seriously (you can read her previous picks here and here). She tries to see all of the critically acclaimed films. She even attended a screening of the Live Action Short Films. Her pick? Boogaloo and Graham (Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney). I’ll have to take her word for it. You can watch that short here:

Amanda: We need to start by putting our cards on the table by telling the readers what we haven’t yet seen. I’ll admit, 2014 was a very busy year for me, and many of the nominated films never even played in my city, so while I tried to cram in as many of these as I could before our annual interview, there are still a lot I  never saw. The critical darlings I have yet to see include: The Imitation Game (Morten Tyldum), Foxcatcher (Bennett Miller), Still Alice (Wash Westmoreland), The Judge (David Dobkin), Wild (Jean-Marc Vallée), and Inherent Vice (PT Anderson).

Mom: Of the big movies, I haven’t seen Selma (Ava DuVernay) or Still Alice. Everything else, I have seen.

Everything else?

Everything else.

Impressive! So what is your pick for Best Picture?

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It’s very difficult this year; I loved all of them. One of my favorite films through the entire process was Theory of Everything (James Marsh). I thought it was phenomenal the way Hawking’s life was portrayed. But, recently I’ve changed my mind a little, maybe because I’ve been reading the reviews and editorials and American Sniper

[loud groan]

…was one that they truly loved because it managed to bring people back into the movie theaters.

It did, but is that what a Best Picture is? A film that a lot of people go to see? Because if that’s the case, then 50 Shades of Grey (Sam Taylor-Johnson) will win the Oscar for Best Picture next year.

Good point. But I loved American Sniper because it’s portrayal of an American soldier going to war and what he had to deal with and the effect on him as well as his family, was so powerful.

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I agree with you there. It was powerful. But for me, the big problem with American Sniper is that I thought it’s message was very confused. I don’t know what Clint Eastwood thought he was doing with that movie because it seems to be telling two very contradictory stories about contemporary war. I thought the film glamorized Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper), who was a devoted soldier and an excellent marksman, but what was problematic for me was that it also glamorized what he was doing: shooting people. I think it’s possible to honor the soldier and tell his story without glamorizing killing. Having said that, it was a well-made film because Eastwood is a good filmmaker.

But Eastwood is giving us the perception of the soldier. If my son, or grandson, or granddaughter, were in the army and going in and out of those homes, I would like a sniper there to protect them!

I’m not disputing the need for a soldier like Chris Kyle. I’m disputing the way Eastwood depicted the act of killing, the way he glamorized it. I think that was irresponsible and I also think that’s precisely why the film is so popular right now.

Well, look, Eastwood was just following the book written by Chris Kyle, that’s all he did…

[side eye]

Look, we’re not going to agree on this one. But still, I keep coming back to Theory of Everything. That’s my pick for Best Picture. I know you didn’t care for it.

Can you tell me something that was good about Theory of Everything that *doesn’t* include Eddie Redmayne’s performance?

Well, it’s the story of this genius and what he endured and what he’s accomplished and the fact that he’s still alive. I thought it was a beautiful film.

Let me pause you right there. I agree that Stephen Hawking’s story is amazing. The fact that he was struck with this debilitating disease and the fact that he was also a genius who profoundly shaped the way we understand the universe, those are two remarkable stories happening to the same man at once. But that’s my point — Hawking’s is a great story on its own, regardless of how the filmmaker tells it. I don’t feel like the movie did anything interesting with this truly remarkable story. I think Hawking deserves a better film than this. Eddie Redmayne’s performance is the only redeemable part of the film for me.

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I should also say that one of the other best films I saw this year was Whiplash (Damien Chazelle).

I was very “meh” on Whiplash.

I thought the portrayal of Fletcher, by J.K. Simmons, and this young vulnerable boy (Miles Teller) at a music conservatory — and this was obviously supposed to be Juilliard — was so amazing. We get to watch this professor, who knew he found a great talent who was not responding, and the way he chose to address that. Definitely one of the most memorable films that I’ve seen.

I’ll give it that. And frankly, I thought Miles Teller, who plays Andrew, should have been given a Best Actor nomination…

I don’t know about that — he was so overshadowed by Simmons.

[angry noises]

And you know, the problem for me this year is that there were a lot of really wonderful films. It’s hard to pick.

I disagree! I was disappointed with pretty much everything I saw.

Boyhood_film

So let’s talk about Boyhood (Richard Linklater). I thought it was very cute, very nice, how they filmed this boy from when he was a child up through his young adulthood but…

[ she trails off, shrugs her shoulders]

I agree. I love Linklater — Dazed and Confused (1993) is one of my favorite films — and the performances in Boyhood were just fine. But had this been a film with different actors playing the role of Mason (Ellar Coltrane), I don’t think I would have given it a second thought.

Exactly. It was very sweet, but that’s all it was.

Boyhood was very satisfying. I really enjoyed the cinematic experience of watching a character age over time. Just lovely. But now that the film is over? I just don’t care. I mean, whatever, he grew up, so what?

Right. Another film we haven’t talked about is The Imitation Game, which was superb because of Benedict Cumberbatch. Other than that? It wasn’t that great.

And we can’t base a Best Picture pick solely on the strong performance of the lead actor. Let’s chat briefly about Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson). I am huge Wes Anderson fan. But I fell asleep during this movie and I had no interest in waking up.

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I thought it was stupid!

I also thought it was stupid. I guess we can move on then?

 

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I’d like to talk about Selma even though you haven’t had a chance to see it yet. I thought the film was well-directed, but there was nothing remarkable about it. The best thing about it — beyond the story — was the performance by David Oyelowo. I thought he was really great in this role and that he absolutely should have been given a Best Actor nomination. Eddie Redmayne remains my Best Actor pick but Oyelowo’s portrayal of Martin Luther King, Jr. was subtle and powerful at the same time. It would have been very easy to get it wrong — after all, we’ve all seen footage of King giving speeches on television, but Oyelowo did a lovely job. But as for the film itself? Like Theory of Everything, Selma tells a remarkable story in a rather bland film. A Best Picture has to do something other than pick a good story. It’s also about how the story is told.

Let’s move on to the only movie that I think should never win Best Picture and that is Birdman: The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance (Alejandro González Iñárritu).

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And that is actually my pick for Best Picture.

Ooooooooooo…

And let me tell you why. It was the only movie from the Best Picture list that really stuck with me after it was over. The movie is essentially, except for the very end, a single take (or what appears to be a single take). The movie never pauses. To achieve this — beyond the use of CGI to mask the moments where the cuts actually took place — Iñárritu and his crew had to plot out where every actor had to be at every moment. Everyone had to hit their marks at the exact right time. To do all that, to coordinate all that with everyone on set, is amazing. And then on top of the technical feats, I thought the story of an aging action hero trying to do an adaptation of a Raymond Carver story for the stage, was really smart and timely. It stuck with me.

So you want Birdman?

Yes.

As Best Picture of the year?

Yes.

[side eye]

So let’s talk quickly about the acting categories. We’ll start with Best Actor in a leading role.

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This one is tough for me. Through the entire season, Eddie Redmayne has been my choice. But, there was another actor whose performance has haunted me, and that’s Steve Carell in Foxcatcher. He is very disturbing — you hate him.  He attracts these young men who are wrestlers and he wants to be their coach, their father, everything. I went home and Googled this guy, duPont, and Steve Carell looked, talked, and acted just like this man. One of the most disturbing films I’ve ever watched. But his performance of this mentally deranged man was really impressive. Still, Redmayne is my pick.

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Me too. He truly gave the best performance. And granted, the role provided a lot of opportunities for Redmayne to demonstrate his acting skill. He had to both impersonate a living person whose demeanor and expressions are well known and it was also a very physical role, mimicking the impact of ALS on his character’s body. It was pretty amazing…

Amazing!

So we agree on that. Let’s move on to Best Supporting Actor. I haven’t seen two of these movies, so…

 Well, I’ve seen all of these films and if JK Simmons doesn’t win for Whiplash then I am done with these interviews.

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Really? You’re willing to give up ever appearing on this blog again…

You’ve seen Whiplash?

Yes, but…

Well then. I would accept no pay to keep me back in [your blog]…

So I’m going to have to call the Academy is what you’re saying?

Uh, yeah.

Wow, that’s a shame, because I think Ed Norton should win for Birdman.

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[ noises of disgust,  growls?, other indistinguishable noises]

Why can’t I have my pick?! On top of all the crazy stuff that was going on in that movie, all I could think about was Ed Norton. He was electric in that film: funny, twitchy, narcissistic. So dynamic…

I can’t even remember him from that film…

WHAT? We clearly didn’t see the same movie. He’s my pick, he’s not going to win…

He better not…

But he’s my pick all the same. Let it be noted.

[blows a raspberry]

Best Actress. Now I’ve only seen two of these so I don’t feel qualified to make a pick.

I’ve not seen Still Alice but I hear Julianne Moore is great.

She is great in everything she does. Let’s just both award this to Julianne Moore.

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Yes, let’s do it! I’ll you why: I wasn’t impressed with any of the female roles this year.*

Know why? Because all the female roles were shit.

Well, you might be right.

Best Supporting Actress. Once again, I haven’t seen two of the nominees but I think Patricia Arquette deserves this one. I was so fascinated by her character. We meet her as this struggling single mother who gradually collects these degrees and then becomes an intellectual in her own right. But she keeps marrying the worst men.

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I’ve seen all of them and none of them impressed me. They were all just there. Sure, we’ll give it to Patricia.

Closing thoughts?

I just really hated Birdman.

Noted.

 FIN

*The day after this interview, Nana admitted to being a little hasty with her Best Actress pick. Over breakfast she told me she wanted to change her pick to Reese Witherspoon in Wild. She also called me from the road today to be sure that change was noted. Please note it.

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5 thoughts on “My Mom’s 2015 Oscar Picks

    mp3dosedailyz said:
    February 17, 2015 at 12:40 am

    lol, i love this intro

    kkdbay said:
    February 17, 2015 at 3:30 am

    That’s cool. Does she knows about FURY? That movie is…………..you know the rest.

    catalystpoet said:
    February 18, 2015 at 5:39 am

    I love these 🙂

    And I also fell asleep during Grand Budapest Hotel … both times I tried to watch it.

    angharadeyre said:
    February 19, 2015 at 9:22 am

    This is the best round up of the nominations I’ve read so far – thanks for sharing all your views! But you’re both wrong about Grand Budapest Hotel – I found it funny, clever, and surprisingly moving.

    My Mom’s 2016 Oscar Picks « judgmental observer said:
    February 16, 2016 at 3:42 pm

    […] like to catch up on my mother’s picks in previous years, you can see 2012, 2014 and 2015. As for the rest of you, let’s get started, shall […]

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